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  • Child Poverty Stats Conflict; $ At Stake (New Haven Independent)

    Media Coverage

    More New Haven families are sliding into poverty — at least according to a count of students that state officials are now second-guessing. A year ago, state and local officials tallied up 14,919 students within New Haven’s school system who are growing up in cash-strapped households. If those numbers are right, they would mean that, 2,997 local kids had recently fallen into poverty, qualifying them for a subsidized school lunch. That would mark a 25 percent increase in just one year, for a total of about 14,900 kids whose families are struggling to pay the bills.

  • Suburbs Profit Off New Haven’s Magnets (New Haven Independent)

    Media Coverage

    Suburban school districts are being paid millions of dollars for students that they don’t teach, while sticking New Haven taxpayers with the bill for educating their kids. Thanks to a funding formula that experts say is broken, the state has been paying out money to the municipalities where students live, rather than where they go to school.

  • Analysis of State Education Funding in Adopted Biennial Budget, FYs 2020-2021

    News

    On Tuesday, June 4, the Connecticut General Assembly adopted a biennial state budget for fiscal years 2020 and 2021, which was sent to Governor Ned Lamont for his signature. Included in the biennial budget are several changes to state education funding, including changes to funding levels for the Education Cost Sharing (ECS) grant, schools of choice, and other education grants. The Connecticut School Finance Project has prepared two documents that offer a brief overview of the state education funding and school finance changes contained in the biennial state budget adopted by the General Assembly.

  • Lawmakers are jeopardizing school funding equity — again (CT Mirror)

    Op-ed

    While the structure of Connecticut's new Education Cost Sharing formula is strong and should be maintained, an education funding formula is only as good as the data it uses. Unfortunately, the spending plan adopted by the General Assembly’s Appropriations Committee last week ignores this principle and threatens the accuracy and integrity of the new formula by using an inaccurate count of low-income students and continuing to identify such students through an outdated and unreliable method.

  • Analysis of State Education Funding in Appropriations Committee's Proposed Budget for FYs 2020 and 2021

    News

    On Tuesday, April 30, the leadership of the General Assembly’s Appropriations Committee introduced a biennial spending plan for fiscal years 2020 and 2021. The spending plan was adopted the same day by the Committee on a party line vote. Included in the Appropriations Committee’s spending plan are several changes to state education funding, including changes to funding levels for the Education Cost Sharing (ECS) grant, schools of choice, and other education grants. The Connecticut School Finance Project has prepared two documents that offer a brief overview of the state education funding contained in the Appropriations Committee's spending plan along with the biennial state budget proposed by Governor Ned Lamont in February 2019.

  • Katie Roy Testifies Before Education Committee on Minimum Budget Requirement, S.B. 1068

    Legislative Testimony

    (Monday, March 18, 2019) Testimony Regarding S.B. 1068, An Act Concerning the Minimum Budget Requirement

  • Katie Roy Testifies in Front of Planning and Development Committee on Fiscally Independent School Districts, H.B. 7319

    Legislative Testimony

    (Friday, March 15, 2019) Testimony Regarding H.B. 7319, An Act Concerning Fiscal Independence of School Districts

  • PERSPECTIVE: Research Worth Review in School Regionalization Debate (CT By the Numbers)

    Op-ed

    School district consolidation. Mention this concept to Connecticut residents and you’re sure to get a variety of opinions, passionate arguments and disagreements, and questions and concerns about what it would mean for their local public schools. This reaction has been evident over the past few months since the introduction of several pieces of legislation concerning the regionalization and/or consolidation of school districts. However, one important thing has, unfortunately, been largely absent from this reaction and the conversation about school district consolidation: a fair and honest look at the research.

  • Katie Roy Submits Testimony to Appropriations Committee on State Education Funding in Governor's Budget, H.B. 7148

    Legislative Testimony

    (Wednesday, March 6, 2019) Testimony Regarding H.B. 7148, An Act Concerning the State Budget for the Biennium Ending June Thirtieth, 2021, and Making Appropriations Therefor

  • Katie Roy Submits Testimony to Education Committee on School Regionalization/Consolidation Bills

    Legislative Testimony

    (Friday, March 1, 2019) Testimony Regarding Proposed S.B. 457, An Act Concerning the Size of School Districts; Proposed S.B. 738, An Act Concerning the Creation of Regional School Districts; and S.B. 874, An Act Concerning Education Initiatives and Services in Connecticut