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  • Analysis of Senate and House Republicans' Revised Proposed Changes to Education Funding

    News

    Yesterday, Senate and House Republicans released their revised budget for the FY 2018–FY 2019 biennium. Included in this budget proposal were several changes to the Education Cost Sharing (ECS) formula. In an effort to provide useful information for policymakers, educators, community leaders, and all individuals interested in how Connecticut funds its public schools, the Connecticut School Finance Project has prepared an independent analysis examining the Republicans’ proposed school funding changes.

  • Analysis of Governor Malloy's Revised Budget Proposal

    News

    On Friday, September 8, Governor Dannel Malloy proposed his revised budget for the FY 2018–FY 2019 biennium. Included in this budget proposal were several changes to the Education Cost Sharing (ECS) formula. In an effort to provide useful information for policymakers, educators, community leaders, and all individuals interested in how Connecticut funds its public schools, the Connecticut School Finance Project has prepared an independent analysis examining the governor's proposed school funding changes.

  • UPDATED: Comparison of School Funding Proposals

    News

    Last week, the General Assembly’s House Democratic caucus released an updated budget proposal for the FY 2018–FY 2019 biennium. With the release of this latest budget proposal, the Connecticut School Finance Project — as it has done previously — has produced an independent analysis comparing the budgetary impacts and structures of each of the various school finance proposals that have emerged during this year’s regular and special legislative sessions.

  • Democrats’ school funding plan ‘not legitimate, logical or responsible’ (CT Mirror)

    Op-ed

    For nearly four decades, our state has struggled to equitably fund its public schools, and now Connecticut counts itself as one of only four states in the nation not currently using a formula to distribute state education aid. Connecticut has arrived in this position because instead of addressing the school funding challenges our state faces, state and legislative leadership have too often resorted to temporary fixes, patchwork policies, and flawed formulas. The budget proposal released by House Democrats on August 23, unfortunately, continues this trend by failing to include a comprehensive school funding formula that is logical, equitable, or even remotely realistic. While there are certainly aspects of the House Democratic budget proposal worthy of discussion and debate, its formula for distributing state education aid — a formula which would require the state to increase state education aid by more than $800 million above the current level and take more than 50 years to fully fund — is not one of them.

  • Analysis of Revised Executive Order Resource Allocation Plan: State Education Funding

    News

    On Friday, August 18, Governor Dannel Malloy released revisions to his Executive Order Resource Allocation Plan that has been in effect since July 1 after the Connecticut General Assembly did not pass a budget before the start of the new fiscal year. The governor’s Revised Executive Order Resource Allocation Plan contains significant changes to state education funding, including a more than $557 million cut (from FY 2017 funding levels) to the Education Cost Sharing (ECS) grant, which is the primary vehicle for state education funding to local and regional school districts. 

  • Gov. Malloy's Executive Order from June 30

    News

    Recently, we have received multiple inquiries from policymakers, superintendents, school board members, and concerned community members about whether Governor Dannel Malloy has issued a “new executive order,” and whether the Connecticut School Finance Project has done an analysis of how the “new executive order” impacts state education aid and Education Cost Sharing (ECS) grants. To help alleviate some of the confusion that we’ve heard and seen, which understandably happens when there is a budget stalemate and the school year is just around the corner, we want to clarify that the only executive order we are aware of that impacts state education aid is the governor’s Executive Order Resource Allocation Plan, which was issued on June 30 and went into effect on July 1.

  • Malloy’s cut to Norwalk 2018 funding prompts ‘concern’ (NancyOnNorwalk)

    Media Coverage

    On June 30, after the legislature failed to come up with a two-year budget, Malloy signed an executive order to keep the state in business, funding state government operations while budget negotiations continue. The Executive Order Resource Allocation Plan included a $4.4 million cut to Norwalk’s education funding in 2018, under the category Education Cost Sharing (ECS). On Monday, Connecticut School Finance Project Director and Founder Katie Roy alerted the public to “significant changes to state education funding, including a $506 million cut to the Education Cost Sharing (ECS) grant.”

  • Here’s why Norwalk stands to lose more than comparable school districts (Norwalk Hour)

    Media Coverage

    The city’s public school district stands to lose much more of its state education cost sharing funding than nearby comparable school districts under Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s interim spending plan absent a Legislature-approved budget. Norwalk Public Schools would see its state funding slashed 40 percent, from roughly $11.2 million to $6.8 million. The Connecticut School Finance Project, a nonprofit that intends to serve as a nonpartisan and independent source for data and information on state education finance, published an analysis of the plan Monday and offered insight into why Norwalk stands to lose more than its comparable districts.

  • What Happens If The State Doesn’t Pass A Budget? The Answer Is Deep Cuts For Schools (Education Connecticut)

    Media Coverage

    Connecticut’s General Assembly was unable to come to a budget agreement by the legislature’s June 30th deadline. The good new is, unlike places like New Jersey and Maine, we didn’t have a government shut down. Our state is still functioning because Governor Dannel P. Malloy signed an Executive Order Resource Allocation Plan. Unfortunately, when it comes to schools, that is the only good news to report. This is no joke — according to an analysis report published by the Connecticut School Funding Project, a non-profit that releases information on schools budgets, Gov. Malloy can’t raise revenues or appropriate funds outside of what’s allowed by state statute. The result is enormous cuts to education, including a $506 million projected cut to the state’s Education Cost Sharing Grant (ECS), the main grant that funds education.

  • Analysis of Executive Order Resource Allocation Plan: State Education Funding

    News

    After the Connecticut General Assembly missed the June 30 deadline to pass a budget before the start of the new fiscal year, Governor Dannel Malloy issued an Executive Order Resource Allocation Plan to fund state government operations while budget negotiations continue. While the Resource Allocation Plan covers all of fiscal year 2018, the legislature can pass a budget at any time, which, when signed by the governor, would supersede the Executive Order. In effort to provide greater clarity and understanding around what the governor’s Executive Order means for state education funding, the Connecticut School Finance Project has prepared an independent analysis that compares state education funding for fiscal year 2017 with the projected state education funding for fiscal year 2018 under the governor’s Executive Order Resource Allocation Plan.