Resource Library

Equality/Equity | View All

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  • KIDS COUNT Data Book: State Trends in Child Well-Being

    The KIDS COUNT Data Book has been examining the educational, social, economic and physical well-being of children for more than a quarter century. In 2017, the annual study ranked Connecticut sixth in the nation for the overall well-being of its children. The state ranked third in children’s health and fourth in youth education. The report shows approximately 15 percent of Connecticut children live in poverty, up two percent since 2010. Twenty-seven percent of the state’s children were part of families in which no parent had secure employment, a one-percent decrease from 2010.

  • Do Poor Kids Get Their Fair Share of School Funding?

    In this May 2017 report, the Urban Institute presents new data on the progressivity of school district funding, focusing on the degree to which the average low-income student attends districts that are better funded than districts the average nonpoor student attends. The report finds that many states that have progressive funding formulas on paper do not achieve this goal in practice, and that, in some states, the potential progressivity of school funding is constrained by patterns of student sorting by income.

  • Issue Brief: CCJEF v. Rell Court Decision

    This issue brief from the Connecticut General Assembly's Office of Legislative Research summarizes Connecticut Superior Court Judge Thomas Moukawsher's September 7, 2016 ruling in Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding (CCJEF) v. Rell. The issue brief details the case's history along with Judge Moukawsher's findings.

  • Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card

    Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card is an annual examination of school funding fairness. Currently in its sixth edition, the report measures the fairness of the school finance systems in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The central purpose of the Report Card is to evaluate the extent to which state systems ensure equality of educational opportunity for all children, regardless of background, family income, where they live, or where they attend school.

  • Dividing Lines - Gated School Districts

    There are over 14,000 school districts across the country. According to this report from EdBuild, many of the 35,000 borders that divide these districts contribute to increasing economic segregation and create barriers to opportunity that is sometimes just out of reach. This occurs in large part because between 40-60 percent of schools’ fortunes depend on property values in the neighborhoods that surround them. According to the report, this reality creates incentives for wealthy areas to wall themselves off from their needy neighbors, keeping their property wealth for their own children’s schools and leaving other communities to fend for themselves. This report highlights examples of these divisions and so-called "island" districts, which are entirely encircled by another district and create barriers to opportunity.

  • Power in Numbers - Cost-Adjusted Revenue, Resource Inequality, and Arbitrary Funding

    In its Power in Numbers series, EdBuild, a national nonprofit that works to create state school funding systems that provide equitable and adequate resources to students and their communities, focuses on the inequities brought about by convoluted state funding systems.

  • School Finance Reform and the Distribution of Student Achievement

    This working paper studies the impacts of post-1990 school finance reforms on gaps in spending and achievement between high-income and low-income school districts. The working paper finds reform events–court orders and legislative reforms–led to sharp, immediate, and sustained increases in absolute and relative spending in low-income school districts. Using representative samples from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, the paper also finds reforms caused gradual increases in the relative achievement of students in low-income school districts.

  • The Sensitivity of Causal Estimates from Court-ordered Finance Reform on Spending and Graduation Rates

    This 2015 study examines the impact of court-ordered school finance reform on per pupil funding and graduation rates. The study estimates the impact of overturning a state’s school finance system and finds that, seven years after reform, a state's highest poverty quartile experienced a 4 to 12 percent increase in per pupil spending and a 5 to 8 percentage point increase in graduation rates.

  • Data Bulletin: Connecticut's English Learners (Grades K-12)

    Data and analysis from the Connecticut State Department of Education on English Learners during the 2009-10, 2011-12, and 2014-15 school years. Bulletins details level of support services as well as test scores and demographic breakdowns.

  • Cheating Our Future: How Decades of Disinvestment by States Jeopardizes Equal Educational Opportunity

    This report from the Leadership Conference Education Fund and Education Law Center examines the deficits in school funding and resources, and documents the wide disparities in students’ educational opportunities from state to state. The report provides real-life examples and brief case studies of funding inequalities throughout the nation, and makes recommendations for how equal educational opportunities can be achieved.