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  • Do Poor Kids Get Their Fair Share of School Funding?

    In this May 2017 report, the Urban Institute presents new data on the progressivity of school district funding, focusing on the degree to which the average low-income student attends districts that are better funded than districts the average nonpoor student attends. The report finds that many states that have progressive funding formulas on paper do not achieve this goal in practice, and that, in some states, the potential progressivity of school funding is constrained by patterns of student sorting by income.

  • Issue Brief: CCJEF v. Rell Court Decision

    This issue brief from the Connecticut General Assembly's Office of Legislative Research summarizes Connecticut Superior Court Judge Thomas Moukawsher's September 7, 2016 ruling in Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding (CCJEF) v. Rell. The issue brief details the case's history along with Judge Moukawsher's findings.

  • Issue Brief: Education Cost Sharing Grant Formula

    This issue brief from the Connecticut General Assembly's Office of Legislative Research examines the Education Cost Sharing (ECS) grant, its legislative history, and its basic structure.

  • Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card

    Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card is an annual examination of school funding fairness. Currently in its sixth edition, the report measures the fairness of the school finance systems in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The central purpose of the Report Card is to evaluate the extent to which state systems ensure equality of educational opportunity for all children, regardless of background, family income, where they live, or where they attend school.

  • Public Education Funding Mechanisms in Other States

    This research report from the Connecticut General Assembly's Office of Legislative Research examines funding formulas for public education used by other states, and provides several examples. The report uses research from the Education Commission of the States, a nonpartisan organization created by states to track state policy trends, translate academic research, and provide unbiased evidence about education topics. According to the Commission, there are three primary types of public education funding formulas: (1) foundation programs, (2) resource allocation systems, and (3) a hybrid of the two.

  • PreK-12 Public Education: How Massive Underfunding Threatens Connecticut's Social and Economic Future

    In preparation for the 2016 elections, the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities issued this candidate bulletin detailing flaws in Connecticut’s school funding system and why a new formula is needed. In addition to calling for a new school funding formula, the candidate bulletin urges state policymakers to implement changes to how special education is funded.

  • Power in Numbers - Cost-Adjusted Revenue, Resource Inequality, and Arbitrary Funding

    In its Power in Numbers series, EdBuild, a national nonprofit that works to create state school funding systems that provide equitable and adequate resources to students and their communities, focuses on the inequities brought about by convoluted state funding systems.

  • Cheating Our Future: How Decades of Disinvestment by States Jeopardizes Equal Educational Opportunity

    This report from the Leadership Conference Education Fund and Education Law Center examines the deficits in school funding and resources, and documents the wide disparities in students’ educational opportunities from state to state. The report provides real-life examples and brief case studies of funding inequalities throughout the nation, and makes recommendations for how equal educational opportunities can be achieved.

  • Improving the Equity and Efficiency of Connecticut’s State K-12 Education Funding – A Student-Based Funding Proposal

    In its 2015 report, the Connecticut Policy Institute offers a detailed proposal for how to reform state education funding in Connecticut. The paper reviews the shortcomings of Connecticut’s current funding system and lays out a detailed proposal for replacing this structure with a new funding system centered on students, not educational bureaucracies. The report also discusses how much state educational aid each municipality or district would receive under the proposal, along with the implications of tweaking different aspects of the proposal.

  • Comparable but Unequal – School Funding Disparities

    In this whitepaper, policy analysts from the Center for American Progress describe why state and district school finance systems perpetuate and compound educational inequities by providing less money to students with the greatest needs. The paper examines the roles of Title 1 and the federal government in education funding, and makes recommendations for how Congress can ensure low-income schools are funded at equal levels with their more affluent counterparts.