Resource Library

Fair Funding | View All

Expanded

|

Collapsed

  • Office of Fiscal Analysis Infographic: The ECS Formula

    This infographic from the Connecticut General Assembly's Office of Fiscal Analysis illustrates the workings of the revised Education Cost Sharing formula, which was passed in October 2017 as part of the bipartisan biennial budget and began being implemented in fiscal year 2019. The ECS formula is the formula the state legislature has established to distribute approximately $2 billion in state education funding to local public school districts.

  • Office of Fiscal Analysis Fact Sheet: ECS Formula Beginning in Fiscal Year 2019

    This fact sheet from the Connecticut General Assembly's Office of Fiscal Analysis details the revised Education Cost Sharing formula, which was passed in October 2017 as part of the bipartisan biennial budget and began being implemented in fiscal year 2019. The ECS formula is the formula the state legislature has established to distribute approximately $2 billion in state education funding to local public school districts. Under the new formula, a district’s full funding is to be phased in over 10 years.

  • Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card

    Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card is an annual examination of school funding fairness. Currently in its seventh edition, the report measures the fairness of the school finance systems in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The central purpose of the Report Card is to evaluate the extent to which state systems ensure equality of educational opportunity for all children, regardless of background, family income, where they live, or where they attend school.

  • CCJEF v. Rell (2018), Connecticut Supreme Court Decision

    In a 4-3 ruling, the Connecticut Supreme Court reversed in part, and affirmed in part, a 2016 ruling from Hartford Superior Court Judge Thomas Moukawsher focused on Connecticut's school finance system. The Supreme Court ruled the way Connecticut allocates state education dollars, and how much the State spends on public education, is constitutional and does not violate Article Eighth § 1 of the Connecticut Constitution.

  • 2017 Changes to the Education Cost Sharing (ECS) Formula

    Research report from the Connecticut General Assembly's nonpartisan Office of Legislative Research that describes the changes made in Conn. Acts 17-2 (June Special Session) to the formula for the Education Cost Sharing (ECS) grant.

  • Making Sense of State School Funding Policy

    This report from the Urban Institute provides a overview of state school funding policy and identifies several themes that stand out when analysis school finance policy across the country.

  • How has education funding changed over time?

    This feature article from the Urban Institute allows users to explore how local, state, and federal education funding have changed over the past two decades. The tool looks at the "level of school district funding over time and at the changes in funding progressivity, or how much more is spent on educating low-income students relative to nonpoor students." In its analysis, the Urban Institute found that "[t]hough education funding has generally increased since the 1990s, overall progressivity has largely been flat, and states vary widely in how much money they spend on education and how they distribute that money."

  • School Funding: Do Poor Kids Get Their Fair Share?

    This feature article from the Urban Institute examines how states are using school finance formulas to allocate additional state dollars to low-income students who research has shown need additional resources to learn at similar levels to their non-need peers. The Urban Institute feature asks the question "Where is education funding progressive?" and looks at state, local, and federal funding to determine whether or not a state's school finance system is progressive, meaning most of the state's education aid is going to low-income students. This question is expanded upon in an Urban Institute brief from May 2017 titled Do Poor Kids Get Their Fair Share of School Funding?

  • Do Poor Kids Get Their Fair Share of School Funding?

    In this May 2017 report, the Urban Institute presents new data on the progressivity of school district funding, focusing on the degree to which the average low-income student attends districts that are better funded than districts the average nonpoor student attends. The report finds that many states that have progressive funding formulas on paper do not achieve this goal in practice, and that, in some states, the potential progressivity of school funding is constrained by patterns of student sorting by income.

  • Issue Brief: CCJEF v. Rell Court Decision

    This issue brief from the Connecticut General Assembly's Office of Legislative Research summarizes Connecticut Superior Court Judge Thomas Moukawsher's September 7, 2016 ruling in Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding (CCJEF) v. Rell. The issue brief details the case's history along with Judge Moukawsher's findings.