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The racial demographic makeup of Connecticut's student population is roughly 50% white and 50% Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC). However, by and large, Connecticut's school districts do not represent this diverse student population. Instead, the segregation across Connecticut's cities and towns has a direct impact on the racial and economic makeup of Connecticut's school districts.

School District Segregation

As a result, Connecticut’s public school districts are highly segregated with most students attending a district where more than 75% of the students are white, or a district where more than 75% of the students are BIPOC.

In fact, approximately 60% of all Black students attend a district where the white student
population is less than 25% of the district’s total enrollment. Additionally, a majority of the state’s BIPOC students are concentrated in less than 10 districts, and over 40% of Connecticut’s BIPOC students who attend a local public school district attend one where the total student population is over 75% BIPOC.

Use the maps below to view these disparities and see the enrollment and demographic information for each local and regional public school district, charter school, and Regional Educational Service Center (RESC). Hover over a district on the map to view its specific data and information for the selected metric. To search for a district on one of the maps, click on the magnifying glass below the map legend.

Segregated Borders

Exacerbating this segregation is the fact that districts with higher percentages of BIPOC students generally serve students with greater learning needs (such as English Learners or students from economically disadvantaged households) but spend less per student. Oppositely, Connecticut public school districts with higher percentages of white
students serve students with less learning needs but spend more per student.

Plainly stated: districts with greater needs, and more students of color, tend have fewer financial resources.

Use the maps below to see how these disparities in race and wealth play out between bordering communities.

For the map underneath the "Student Race" tab, each red dot represents a segregated border where there is at least a 20 percentage point difference between the percentage of BIPOC students served by the Base District (shaded in yellow) and the percentage of BIPOC students served by the Neighbor District (shaded in blue).

For the map underneath the "Low-Income" tab, each red dot represents a segregated border where there is at least a 20 percentage point difference between the percentage of economically disadvantaged students served by the Base District (shaded in yellow) and the percentage of economically disadvantaged students served by the Neighbor District (shaded in blue)

Hover over a red dot on the map to view the data for each of the bordering districts and to see the calculated difference between the two. To search for a district on one of the maps, click on the magnifying glass below the map legend.

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